Words: John Newton, Ol­ney Hymns (Lon­don: W. Ol­iv­er, 1779).

Music: St. Pe­ter (Rein­a­gle), Alex­an­der R. Rein­a­gle, Psalm Tunes for the Voice and Pi­an­o­for­te (Ox­ford, Eng­land: 1836). Al­ter­nate tunes:

  • Heber, George Kings­ley, 1838 
  • Ortonville, Thom­as Hast­ings, 1837 

How sweet the Name of Jesus sounds
In a believer’s ear!
It soothes his sorrows, heals his wounds,
And drives away his fear.

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Words: Will­iam Cow­per, in Twen­ty-six Let­ters on Re­li­gious Sub­jects, by John New­ton, 1774. It is re­port­ed­ly the last hymn Cow­per ev­er wrote, with a fas­cin­at­ing (though un­sub­stan­ti­at­ed) story be­hind it.

Cow­per oft­en strug­gled with de­press­ion and doubt. One night he de­cid­ed to com­mit su­i­cide by drown­ing him­self. He called a cab and told the driv­er to take him to the Thames Riv­er. How­ev­er, thick fog came down and pre­vent­ed them from find­ing the riv­er (ano­ther ver­sion of the story has the driv­er get­ting lost de­liber­ate­ly).

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Words: James Montgomery, Poet’s Port­fo­lio, 1835.

Music: Terra Be­a­ta, tra­di­tion­al Eng­lish mel­o­dy, ar­ranged by Frank­lin L. Shep­pard in his Al­le­lu­ia, 1915. Al­ter­nate tune:

  • Nearer Home, Isaac B. Wood­bu­ry, 1852; har­mo­ny by Ar­thur S. Sul­li­van, 1874

“Forever with the Lord!”
Amen, so let it be!
Life from His death is in that word
’Tis immortality.
Here in the body pent,
Absent from Him I roam,

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Words: Ka­tha­ri­na A. von Schle­gel, in Neue Samm­lung Geist­lich­er Lied­er, 1752 (Stille, meine Wille, dein Je­sus hilft sie­gen); trans­lat­ed from Ger­man to Eng­lish by Jane L. Borth­wick in Hymns from the Land of Lu­ther, 1855.

Music: Fin­land­ia, Jean Si­bel­i­us, 1899. Al­ter­nate tune:

  • Unde et Memores, Will­iam H. Monk, 1875 

This hymn was re­port­ed­ly the fav­or­ite of Er­ic Lid­dell, the ath­lete who be­came fa­mous in the 1924 Olym­pics for re­fus­ing to run on the Sab­bath (see the mo­vie Char­i­ots of Fire).

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Words: Will­iam C. Dix, Al­tar Songs, Vers­es on the Ho­ly Eu­cha­rist, 1867.

Music: Hyfrydol, Row­land H. Pri­chard, 1830. Al­ter­nate tunes:

  • Adoration (Lu­ard-Sel­by), Ber­tram Lu­ard-Sel­by, in Hymns An­cient and Mo­dern, 1904
  • Alleluia (Wes­ley), Sam­u­el S.Wes­ley, in the Eu­ro­pe­an Psalm­ist, 1872 

Alleluia! sing to Jesus! His the scepter, His the throne.
Alleluia!

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Words: John El­ler­ton, A Li­tur­gy for Mis­sion­a­ry Meet­ings, 1870. Queen Vic­tor­ia chose this hymn to be sung at the 60th an­ni­vers­a­ry of her reign in 1897; it was al­so sung at the cer­e­mo­ny when Bri­tain re­turned con­trol of Hong Kong to Chi­na in 1997.

Music: St. Cle­ment, Cle­ment C. Schole­field, writ­ten for this text, and ap­pear­ing in Church Hymns with Tunes, 1874. Al­ter­nate tune:

  • Com­mand­ments, Lou­is Bour­geois, 1543

The day Thou gavest,

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Words: Scot­tish Psal­ter, 1650.

Music: Cri­mond, Jes­sie S. Ir­vine, 1872. Al­ter­nate tunes:

  • Bel­mont, Will­iam Gar­din­er, 1812
  • Evan, Wil­liam H. Hav­er­gal, 1847; ar­ranged by Low­ell Ma­son, 1850
  • Mar­tyr­dom, Hugh Wil­son, 1800; ar­ranged by Ralph E. Hud­son, cir­ca 1885
  • Or­ling­ton, John Camp­bell (1807-1860)  (re­peats third line of each verse)
  • Wilt­shire, George T. Smart, 1795

The Lord’s my Shepherd,

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Words: Hen­ry F. Lyte, Spir­it of the Psalms, 1834. This hymn was sung at the wed­ding of the fu­ture Queen Eliz­a­beth II of Bri­tain, in West­min­ster Ab­bey, Lon­don, 1947.

Music: Lauda An­i­ma, John Goss, in Sup­ple­ment­al Hymn and Tune Book, third edi­tion with new Ap­pen­dix, by Ro­bert Brown-Borth­wick, 1869. Al­tern­ate tunes:

  • Benediction (Hay­dn), Franz J. Haydn (1732-1809)
  • Regent Square, Hen­ry T. Smart, 1867 

Praise,

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Words: John Q. Adams (1767-1848).

Music: Ham­burg, Low­ell Ma­son, 1824; first ap­peared in The Bos­ton Han­del and Hay­dn So­ci­e­ty Coll­ect­ion of Church Mu­sic, third edi­tion, 1825.

O Lord my God! how great art Thou!
With honor and with glory crowned;
Light’s dazzling splendors veil Thy brow,
And gird the universe around.

Spirits and angels Thou hast made;
Thy ministers a flaming fire;

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Words & Music: George Ben­nard, 1913.

The Old Rug­ged Cross was writ­ten in Al­bi­on, Mi­chi­gan. Or Po­ka­gon, Mi­chi­gan. Or Stur­geon Bay, Wis­con­sin. All three towns claim to be the birth­place of this hymn.

On a hill far away stood an old rugged cross,
The emblem of suffering and shame;
And I love that old cross where the dearest and best
For a world of lost sinners was slain.

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